The Wrinkly Rambler

Pleasant walks with camera and three dogs

To Great Hill and Round Loaf

Today my friend John and I decided to take the dogs for a stroll across Anglezarke Moor to visit Great Hill and the Neolithic burial mound called Round Loaf. The hot conditions made it hard work at times for me, but the excellent views made it well worth the effort.

Map of the route. Click on each picture to see an enlargement.

Map of the route. Click on each picture to see an enlargement.

I parked the car on Knowsley Lane, that runs between Anglezarke and Higher Rivington Reservoirs, then John and I, together with my dogs Brett and Sam, crossed the road and walked to the sharp left bend and took the path into the woods. Grid ref: SD621 155.

Path leading off Knowsley Lane

Path leading off Knowsley Lane

At the top of the climb the path meets the one that runs alongside Yarrow Reservoir (it’s just on the other side of the high grassy bank shown in the top of the picture) where we turned left to head towards Parsons Bullough Road.

Reaching the path near Yarrow Reservoir

Reaching the path near Yarrow Reservoir

Pretty soon we reached the end of the path at its junction with Parsons Bullough Road, where we turned right for Allance Bridge.

Gate leading onto Parsons Bullough Road

Gate leading onto Parsons Bullough Road

At the point where Parsons Bullough Road turns sharp right to cross Allance Bridge we went through the gate straight ahead and took the path into Lead Mines Clough. Grid ref: SD627 160.

Reaching Allance Bridge

Reaching Allance Bridge

After a short climb the path meets several others near another footbridge. The one going sharp left would take you to Jepsons Gate and Moor Road, the one straight ahead would take you into Lead Mines Clough and the remains of an old pump house, and the one going off to the right would take you on a route past several derelict farms.

Junction of four paths

Junction of four paths

We took the path to the right, but then immediately went through a gate in the fence and continued walking alongside Limestone Brook.

Go through the gate in the fence

Go through the gate in the fence

There is a parallel path on the other river bank but I find this one just a little more scenic.

Path by the river

Path by the river

This path eventually took us to yet another footbridge, where John and I crossed the river close by the remains of the old pump house.

Crossing another footbridge

Crossing another footbridge

This path then took us uphill to join another path, where we turned right and continued uphill to the war memorial commemorating the crew of an Royal Air Force Wellington bomber that crashed there during the second world war. Grid ref: SD628 165.

Climbing up the path to the war memorial

Climbing up the path to the war memorial

To the left of the war memorial there is a gate in the fence. From there we went diagonally left uphill across a field to another gate leading out onto the path to Jepson’s Gate.

Gate near the war memorial

Gate near the war memorial

For the very few occasions this gate is locked, there is a step-over stile next to it to ensure you don’t get snagged on the barbed wire fence. πŸ˜‰

Step stile near the gate

Step stile near the gate

After a short walk along the path we arrived at Jepson’s Gate, where we went straight ahead on Moor Road. Grid ref: SD623 169.

Reaching Jepson's Gate

Reaching Jepson’s Gate

Moor Road descends to go past this farm near Manor House.

Past the farm near Manor House

Past the farm near Manor House

Just past the sharp right bend near Manor House we went through this stile in the wall on the left. Grid ref: SD620 171.

Go through the stile on the left

Go through the stile on the left

From there we went straight across a small field to another stile leading to a steep descent into the woods above Anglezarke Reservoir. Care is needed on this descent, especially if the ground is wet.

Through the gate and downhill

Through the gate and downhill

On the way downhill the path comes to a junction with another path coming in from the left. Bear right here and continue downhill past the tiny High Bullough Reservoir. This reservoir was built to supply water to the nearby town of Chorley, but is no longer connected to the water supply and remains as a lovely little nature reserve. Grid ref: SD618 171.

Take the path to the right

Take the path to the right

At the other end of the reservoir we came to a junction with another path where we turned right (ignoring the steps straight ahead).

Turn right at the junction

Turn right at the junction

After an excellent stroll through the woods alongside Anglesarke Reservoir we came to the stile at the junction with Moor Road close by Waterman’s Cottage. Grid ref: SD615 178.

Leaving the woods of Anglezarke Reservoir

Leaving the woods of Anglezarke Reservoir

We crossed the road diagonally left and went through the gate in the fence that gave access to the path towards White Coppice.

The path to White Coppice

The path to White Coppice

This picture gives a view of Stronstrey Bank that leads up onto Anglezarke Moor, and includes an old disused quarry that is now often frequented by climbers.

View of Stronstrey Bank

View of Stronstrey Bank

This picture shows John standing on the footbridge over Dean Black Brook. The brook comes from high on Anglezarke Moor and not far from Great hill. Near White Coppice it is guided via old walls to join the Goit, a water channel designed to deliver water from Roddlesworth Reservoir to Anglezarke Reservoir.

Crossing Dean Black Brook

Crossing Dean Black Brook

The gate on the left leads to the very picturesque cricket pitch at White Coppice. This little hamlet is well worth a visit, with its lovely houses and cricket pitch, but unfortunately that will have to wait for another time as our route was straight on. Grid ref: SD620 190.

Bypassing White Coppice

Bypassing White Coppice

After a few hundred yards of uphill walking the path veers right (the path straight on goes to the village of Brinscall).

Take the path to the right

Take the path to the right

On hearing the sound of heavy breathing (other than my own) I turned round to see this mountain biker coming up the steep incline. Behind him is a view of the small reservoir at the side of White Coppice.

Mountain biker climbing the hill

Mountain biker climbing the hill

After a good deal of uphill walking, during which I struggled in the hot conditions (my old lungs find it hard to breathe when it’s hot), we got our first view of Great Hill from the ruins of Coppice Stile House. Grid ref: SD627 190.

First view of Great Hill

First view of Great Hill

At this point our path meets the one coming in from Brinscall, and here we turn right.

Reaching the path from Brinscall

Reaching the path from Brinscall

Shortly after turning right we came to the ruins of Drinkwaters Farm. It is claimed the rare ore of Witherite was first discovered on Anglezarke Moor near Drinkwaters – named because of a clear spring nearby. Grid ref: SD636 190.

The ruins of Drinkwaters Farm

The ruins of Drinkwaters Farm

Although our path continues straight on uphill towards Great Hill, there is an alternative path off to the right which passes through the ruins of Great Hill Farm.

Alternative path to the right

Alternative path to the right

The final part of the path from White Coppice to Great Hill is paved and, as seen in the picture, leads to a cross shaped stone wall with plenty of seats on which we could rest and have our sandwiches. I must say this was my most strugglesome ascent to Great Hill, for which I blame my aversion to hot weather and my now feeble lung power. However, once I’d had a short rest and cadged some food from John I felt much better and ready for the rest of the walk which, thankfully, was mainly flat or downhill. Grid ref: SD645 190.

Almost at the top of Great Hill

Almost at the top of Great Hill

We continued along the paved path, now downhill, to meet a stile in a fence.

Heading down off Great Hill

Heading down off Great Hill

On clambering over the stile we veered off diagonally to the right towards a rather indistinct path that would take us in a south westerly direction towards Round Loaf.

Leaving the stone path to head right

Leaving the stone path to head right

After crossing over a muddy ditch on the left we headed past a convenient way marker that pointed our way across the moor.

Way marker on the moor

Way marker on the moor

As the weather in recent weeks had been dry there was little mud to be encountered on our stroll across the moor. There was an occasional ditch to cross with care but they presented little trouble on this visit.

The path across the moor

The path across the moor

After a short while the green dome of Round Loaf made its first appearance to our right (see top of picture).

First glimpse of Round Loaf

First glimpse of Round Loaf

At this point the path veered to the right to begin the final approach to Round Loaf.

Almost at the foot of Round Loaf

Almost at the foot of Round Loaf

At the foot of Round Loaf it’s interesting to see the contrast in its vegetation compared to the surrounding moorland. Grid ref: SD638 192.

At the foot of Round Loaf

At the foot of Round Loaf

View of the cairn on Round Loaf and of Winter Hill on the horizon.

View of Winter Hill from Round Loaf

View of Winter Hill from Round Loaf

There are a number of paths radiating out from Round Loaf, the one that would take us to the top of Lead Mines Clough headed in a south westerly direction.

Path from Round Loaf to Lead Mines Clough

Path from Round Loaf to Lead Mines Clough

After a little more strolling across fairly dry moorland the woods surrounding the top of Lead Mines Clough came into view.

The woods near Lead Mines Clough come into view

The woods near Lead Mines Clough come into view

Soon it was time to leave Anglezarke Moor as we headed down to meet the gravel path at the top of Lead Mines Clough.

Coming down off Anglezarke Moor

Coming down off Anglezarke Moor

At the top of Lead Mines Clough Limestone Brook came in from our left from its origins near the Devils Ditch. It wends its way down through the clough to meet the River Yarrow not far from Allance Bridge in an area called The Meeting of the Waters and just before flowing into Yarrow Reservoir. We ignored the wooden footbridge over the brook and continued along the gravel path. Grid ref: SD632 171.

Reaching the top of Lead Mines Clough

Reaching the top of Lead Mines Clough

We went through the gate that leads into the woods of Lead Mines Clough.

Left through the gate into the woods

Left through the gate into the woods

After a short walk along th edge of the woods we arrived back at the war memorial. Grid ref: SD628 165. At the war memorial there is an excellent view of the moors and Winter Hill, as well as a couple of benches to rest your weary bones. πŸ˜‰

View from the war memorial

View from the war memorial

After a short stop to catch my breath and admire the view, we continued downhill to the bridge over Limestone Brook. Brett seems to be trying to see how many sticks he can get into his mouth. πŸ˜‰

Down the path from the war memorial

Down the path from the war memorial

We continued on our way downstream, with Limestone Brook on our right.

Walking alongside Limestone Brook

Walking alongside Limestone Brook

Soon we reached the gate at Allance Bridge that would take us onto Parsons Bullough Road. Grid ref: SD627 160.

Back to Allance Bridge

Back to Allance Bridge

A short walk along the road brought us to the gateway on the left to take us alongside Yarrow Reservoir.

Back to the gate on Parsons Bullough Road

Back to the gate on Parsons Bullough Road

Eventually we reached the junction with the path on the right that would take us downhill to Knowsley Lane.

Down the last path

Down the last path

All too soon we were back to Knowsley Lane and our waiting car. Grid ref: SD621 155.

Back at Knowsley Lane

Back at Knowsley Lane

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