The Wrinkly Rambler

Pleasant walks with camera and three dogs

Great Hill via Dean Black Brook

Map of the route.

Map of the route.

Click on each picture to see an enlargement.

I decided to do this walk after coming across an account of it on an excellent blog called Preston Walkies. Although the total distance was only about four miles, they were the most pleasant I’ve walked for quite a while.

The grid references are taken from the Ordnance Survey map OS287, West Pennine Moors (courtesy of TrackLogs Digital Maps).

I parked the car at the delightful little hamlet of White Coppice, where John and I donned our walking gear whilst Brett and Sam waited impatiently in the back of the car. Grid ref: SD618 190.

Getting ready for the walk.

Getting ready for the walk.

A short distance along the lane we entered the White Coppice cricket ground. White Coppice was also the birthplace of Henry Tate, born 1819, who made his fortune in sugar and founded the Tate Gallery.

Entering White Coppice cricket ground.

Entering White Coppice cricket ground.

White Coppice cricket ground must rate as one of the most picturesque places at which to start or finish a walk. And today it had attracted the attentions of a small group of lady artists, who were busy painting watercolours of the scene as we passed by.

Three lady artists

Three lady artists

After a short chat with the ladies John and I made our way to the start of today’s walk. Brett and Sam had already disappeared through the gate, not being very interested in painting and anxious to be off. 😉

Leaving White Coppice cricket ground

Leaving White Coppice cricket ground

Once through the gate our way lead straight ahead.

Through the gate and straight ahead.

Through the gate and straight ahead.

The path took us alongside Dean Black Brook which, in times past, was used to power Leicester Mill that was owned by the Leicester family (also referred to as Lester or Lister). Evidence of this earlier use can clearly be seen by the extensive stonework in the sides of the brook at this point.

Taking the path alongside Dean Black Brook

Taking the path alongside Dean Black Brook

After a short walk uphill the path veered off to the left and up the side of a small quarry.

Take the path up through the quarry.

Take the path up through the quarry.

This lead to a narrow path through the ferns just above Dean Black Brook.

A narrow path above Dean Black Brook

A narrow path above Dean Black Brook

A little further on we came to a choice of paths: either straight on and remain above the brook, or downwards to the stream bed.

Choice of paths.

Choice of paths.

We chose the downward route and were rewarded with an excellent view. Grid ref: SD623 189.

The path comes down to the stream bed

The path comes down to the stream bed

The lower path continued by the edge of the brook, with an occasional small detour to negotiate a rockier section.

The path temporarily rises above the stream

The path temporarily rises above the stream

With all the fine, dry weather we have had recently there’s not much water flowing down from the moors. I’m sure the brook would look even better after some heavy rain, though I’m not sure I’d want to be standing where I took this picture then. 😉

Not much water in the stream

Not much water in the stream

At this point the path passes through an area that looks like it would be pretty muddy after some rain. On this occasion though it was easy to traverse over. Grid ref: SD634 189.

Negotiating the bed of the stream

Negotiating the bed of the stream

Once again we had to scramble upwards to avoid another rather rocky section.

Climbing out of the stream bed

Climbing out of the stream bed

After trekking through the ferns we got our first glimpse of Great Hill, though with still some way to go yet.

First glimpse of Great Hill

First glimpse of Great Hill

Eventually we left Dean Black Brook and headed past a small copse that would make an excellent picnic spot in the shade. Ahead, on the lower slopes of Great Hill we could see the trees that were hiding the ruins of Great Hill Farm.

Passing by a small copse

Passing by a small copse

Shortly after leaving the copse we took the path that lead away from Dean Black Brook and took us to the ruins of Great Hill Farm. Grid ref: SD641 189.

Approaching the ruins of Great Hill Farm

Approaching the ruins of Great Hill Farm

This would make another excellent picnic spot, but we intended having our lunch up on Great Hill in a few more minutes.

Leaving Great Hill Farm

Leaving Great Hill Farm

We continued along the path from and eventually we arrived at the stile near the junction with the path from Spitlers Edge, and once over the stile we followed the paved path up onto Great Hill..

Reaching the stile below Great Hill

Reaching the stile below Great Hill

Our lunch spot at last on the top of Great Hill. Grid ref: SD646 190.

At the top of Great Hill

At the top of Great Hill

After a sumptious lunch of herring in tomato sauce on granary bread (John had sardines – great minds think alike) it was time to set off along the path back down to White Coppice.

Time to leave Great Hill

Time to leave Great Hill

At the stile just below Great Hill there is a terrific view in the direction we were travelling. The trees on the left are just above Dean Black Brook whilst the trees on the right hide the remains of Drinkwaters Farm.

View from below Great Hill towards Whitew Coppice

View from below Great Hill towards Whitew Coppice

And here we are at the ruins of Drinkwaters Farm, so called it seems because of a clear spring that flows nearby.

At the ruins of Drinkwaters Farm

At the ruins of Drinkwaters Farm

At this point the path straight ahead leads to the village of Brinscall. Our path however continues downhill to the left. Grid ref: SD633 191.

Take the path downhill to the left

Take the path downhill to the left

Here we passed through all that remains of Coppice Stile House, a grand name for what is now just a pile of fallen stones. Grid ref: SD627 190.

Passing through the ruins of Coppice Stile House

Passing through the ruins of Coppice Stile House

Not long afterwards we got our first glimpse of our final destination at White Coppice.

First glimpse of White Coppice

First glimpse of White Coppice

Coming in to White Coppice there is this lovely view of the quarry at Stronstrey Bank. Grid ref: SD620 190.

View of Stronstrey Bank

View of Stronstrey Bank

And so we arrived back at White Coppice after an excellent and very scenic walk.

Back to White Coppice

Back to White Coppice

Just time for one last, longing look at the cottages at the side of the cricket ground.

Last look at the houses near the cricket ground

Last look at the houses near the cricket ground

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This entry was posted on June 22, 2010 by in Country Walks and tagged , , , , , , , , , , .

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